Vixility
Joined: Aug 2022

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Vixility   Junior Member

Though born in New Jersey, John W. May has lived in Colorado all of his life. He currently works in the field of ophthalmology and loves to mountain bike and read history. John first became a lover of poetry in 2008 after having read a poem by John Milton. He has been reading and studying the works of various poets since. Among his favorite poets are Emily Dickinson, Fyodor Tyutchev and W. B. Yeats.

Submitted Poems 12 total

Dahlia

Her lips dripped hues of grenadine—
 Scarlet droplets red—
Soft upon the victim's neck
 Whereupon she fed.

The sweet, the velvet fluid flowed
 Through her quaking veins
Quickening the vital pulse
 Where the darkness reigns.

She swooned...

by John W. May

added by Vixility
20 days ago

The Witch of Aberdeen

She lived outside of Aberdeen
Where Scotland woods stood glum and gray
Above a cavern in between
The rising moon and setting day.
Her laughter seemed to plague the night—

    That is, as some would say;
And oft, through yonder...

by John W. May

added by Vixility
1 month ago

Those Evil Few

With wealth, the likes of Helen's Troy,
There are these few that think they're coy—
They seem so modest, but I warn,
Their modesty is but a ploy.

They hung two 'thieves' the other morn.
In fact, the day my son was born.
Their crime? Some...

by John W. May

added by Vixility
1 month ago

Monarch

These lift me through the airy height
(These wings acquired through a night),
Into a foreign world above
Of light and warmth and truth and love.

What seems a dream are days gone by
When I knew nothing of the sky—
Just toil on an earthly bed...

by John W. May

added by Vixility
1 month ago

Thales

Quod est ante pedes nemo spectat, caeli scrutantur plagas
–Cicero


... and he was fixed on Pleiades
   Who moved across the tranquil night:
Her glinting gown, though hard to see,
   Had brought him to her precious sight.

He plotted,...

by John W. May

added by Vixility
2 months ago

... and 7 more »

Favorite Poets 10 total

Collection 20 total

Latest Comments: 24 total

Poetry.com
In the context of your "about this poem" section, wow! I study warfare and its history with the human race and am always astonished that we can achieve an apathy (that 'effacing and obliterating sensation' you mention) that can allow us to kill thousands and thousands of women and children ... shutters my skin to imagine it. Like you said: unnerving. Thanks for sharing this work ... 

1 day ago

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Poetry.com
Really enjoyed reading and rereading this! Loved the rhythmic pace of the story's warning and the narrator's dialect. Reminded me of The Seafarer, for some reason. Anyhow, excellent work!

1 day ago

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Poetry.com
This is such an enjoyable read—definitely has that Edgar Allan Poe or Charles Baudelaire feel to it. It would be awesome to see this as a short film ... just saying.

1 day ago

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Poetry.com
Excellent work and a well-deserved win. I could hardly imagine enduring such childhood trauma (breaks my heart); and the act of forgiveness that concludes your poem—powerful! Again, congrats.

20 days ago

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Poetry.com
Leslie, so cool! Congratulations. The subject of the poem is so important, and so neglected. Wonderful piece and well-deserved win.

20 days ago

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Poetry.com
The tangible sight of an empty chair where a loved one use to sit—a loved one who is no longer with us—is a palpable reminder of our loss. All the particular memories surrounding this now empty space almost haunt us with missing woe. Even the prospect that we ourselves will one day no longer occupy space in this world is made clear to us.

In addition to the poem’s contemplation of our loss and our finitude, I loved its cadence (particularly the repetitions of the second line of each stanza). The refrains that concluded each stanza also lent a gray and solemn feeling to the poem.

There were many good poems in this contest, but this one in particular kept me coming back. Excellent work!
 

20 days ago

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Poetry.com
The first time I read this poem of yours I was at work. The closing stanza, with its fading echo of life and innocence, teared me up. I was thankful for the point of the poem, and thankful that there were no other coworkers around to witness the emotion that your work produced in me. You are a very talented writer. 

1 month ago

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Poetry.com
A tough write considering the reality behind it, yet at the same time a sympathetic tribute to your readers who have experienced this kind of loss.

1 month ago

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Poetry.com
I had the same question and sent a query to STANDS4 Network. Their reply to me was:

"We consider any poem that has been published in any written form such as magazines or articles a published poem. Additionally, poems that have won contests in the past will be considered such as well. You may, however, nominate a poem that was simply posted on social media."

So, according to that response, poems previously posted on Facebook are consider unpublished and CAN be submitted. I hope this helps.
 

1 month ago

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Poetry.com
Greatly appreciated, thank you …

1 month ago

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Poetry.com
Thank you! I completely agree with you: the combination of capturing the reader’s attention and keeping the poem’s length at a tolerable read-level (without diminishing the storyline) has always been a tricky thing for me. Some poems require length, others don’t. I’m thrilled that you feel this particular work was right where it should be.

Again, thank you …
 

1 month ago

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Poetry.com
“… the lyrical rhyme and rhythm made it my first choice.” The structure of the poem was loosely based on a poem written by Yeats called, “The Song of Wandering Aengus”. I highly recommend checking it out if you haven’t read it already. The rhyme structure and meter itself would eventually emerge as the first stanza of the poem came together for me (a fun process).

Thank you! I very much appreciate your approval …
 

1 month ago

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Poetry.com
Thank you! One of the things I most like about writing poetry is, before anything is even penned, figuring out what structure and rhyme scheme I want to work with ...

1 month ago

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Poetry.com
“I resonate with that and being hurt because you are different.” Absolutely agree! How sad it is that we can be so quick to negatively paint that which we don’t understand or know—worse still, to inflict harm as a result of this. I appreciate your comment, thank you … 

1 month ago

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Poetry.com
Probably the hardest part of the poem for me was trying to imagine the girl’s confusion (‘puzzled face’) during the assault, having no idea that these individuals believed her to be a witch—and worse, unable to convey this confusion to her attackers. 

1 month ago

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