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A Dialogue Betwixt Cordanus And Amoret, On A Lost Heart

Cord. Distressed pilgrim, whose dark clouded eyes
  Speak thee a martyr to love's cruelties,
  Whither away?
Amor. What pitying voice I hear,
  Calls back my flying steps?
Cord. Pr'ythee, draw near.
Amor. I shall but say, kind swain, what doth become
  Of a lost heart, ere to Elysium
  It wounded walks?
Cord. First, it does freely flye
  Into the pleasures of a lover's eye;
  But, once condemn'd to scorn, it fetter'd lies,
  An ever-bowing slave to tyrannies.
Amor. I pity its sad fate, since its offence
  Was but for love. Can tears recall it thence?
Cord. O no, such tears, as do for pity call,
  She proudly scorns, and glories at their fall.
Amor. Since neither sighs nor tears, kind shepherd, tell,
  Will not a kiss prevail?
Cord. Thou may'st as well
  Court Eccho with a kiss.
Amor. Can no art move
  A sacred violence to make her love?
Cord. O no! 'tis only Destiny or Fate
  Fashions our wills either to love or hate.
Amor. Then, captive heart, since that no humane spell
  Hath power to graspe thee his, farewell.
Cord. Farewell.
Cho. Lost hearts, like lambs drove from their folds by fears,
  May back return by chance, but not by tears.]

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Submitted on May 13, 2011

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Richard Lovelace

Richard Lovelace was an English poet more…

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