Nothing Gold Can Stay

Robert Frost 1874 (San Francisco) – 1963 (Boston)



Nature's first green is gold,
Her hardest hue to hold.
Her early leaf's a flower;
But only so an hour.
Then leaf subsides to leaf,
So Eden sank to grief,
So dawn goes down to day
Nothing gold can stay.

About this poem

"Nothing Gold Can Stay" is a short poem written by Robert Frost. It consists of eight lines and follows a simple, yet profound, theme of impermanence and the transience of beauty. The poem begins with the statement that "Nature's first green is gold," and goes on to describe how this golden hue gradually fades away, giving way to the "hardest hue to hold" - green. Frost uses vivid imagery and a naturalistic tone to illustrate the idea that all things in life are ephemeral and that nothing can remain in its pristine state forever. The poem is often interpreted as a metaphor for the fleeting nature of youth, love, and innocence. The concise language and evocative imagery of "Nothing Gold Can Stay" have made it one of Frost's most beloved and widely anthologized works. 

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Submitted on May 13, 2011

Modified by acronimous on March 14, 2023

15 sec read
5,196

Quick analysis:

Scheme AABBCCDD
Closest metre Iambic trimeter
Characters 209
Words 48
Stanzas 1
Stanza Lengths 8

Robert Frost

Robert Lee Frost was an American poet. His work was initially published in England before it was published in America. He is highly regarded for his realistic depictions of rural life and his command of American colloquial speech. more…

All Robert Frost poems | Robert Frost Books

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2 Comments
  • Passerby
    Amazing! Frost dives into sublime depth with so easy words and similes and metaphors.
    LikeReply5 days ago
  • TankTopTaco
    It seems that there is some doubt in Mr. Frost's belief in the divine. It seems since in our world all things dim or die; so will the currency from his god's check will dry up.
    LikeReply 13 years ago

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"Nothing Gold Can Stay" Poetry.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 14 Jun 2024. <https://www.poetry.com/poem/30884/nothing-gold-can-stay>.

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