Camden Poplars



Old soldiers these, their lances guarding land
Purloined from tribe and tilled by convict hand.
Macarthur’s sheep they pierced and prodded back
With solid shafts of shadow golden-black.

Till trade took root upon Nepean’s banks
And profit bloomed beyond the stick of reason.
The aspens drop their arms in sagging ranks –
The river floods regardless of the season
The river floods and with appropriate thanks
I wake and work some conscientious treason.

Bright spear of peace that seldom suburb has.
The spire of Camden church now guards the trees.
I smile, my irksome day accomplished, as
Their hands bid welcome, waving in the breeze.

About this poem

We lived in Camden, which is a country satellite town south-west of Sydney. My husband and I loved the way the trees welcomed us home each night.

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Submitted by susannaelliott on April 14, 2024

34 sec read
105

Quick analysis:

Scheme AABB CDCDCD EFEF
Closest metre Iambic pentameter
Characters 645
Words 114
Stanzas 3
Stanza Lengths 4, 6, 4

Susanna Elliott-Newth

Susanna is a teacher, living near the coastal fringes of the Illawarra Coastline in NSW, Australia. Her environment is her stimulus for her writing. She has published four books of short stories, as well as her own memoir book, and writes educational resources for teachers. more…

All Susanna Elliott-Newth poems | Susanna Elliott-Newth Books

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2 Comments
  • fredda.sjoman
    For masterfully rhythmic and natural verses in a romantic ode to the environment we routinely forget to see.
    LikeReply15 days ago
  • JokerGem
    This is an unorthodox poem - what with the rhyme scheme being different in each stanza - but I happen to like unorthodoxy and trees are an excellent subject for artwork.
    – I've been enjoying your contributions since you joined the site! 
    LikeReply15 days ago

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"Camden Poplars" Poetry.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 24 May 2024. <https://www.poetry.com/poem/185294/camden-poplars>.

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