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Cree Fairies.

"Did earth ever see
On thy prairie's line
Tribes older than thine,
Old Chief of the Cree?"
 
"Before us we know
Of none who lived here;
Our shafts bade them go.
 
"But others have share
Of lake and of land,
A swift-footed band
No arrow can scare.
 
"Their coming has been
When flowers are gay;
On islet and bay
Their footprints are seen.
 
"There dance little feet
Light grasses they break;
Beneath the blue lake
Must be their retreat.
 
"We listen, and none
Hears ever a sound;
But where, lily-crowned,
Floats the isle in the sun,
 
"Three children we see
Like sunbeams at play.
And, voiceless as they,
Dogs bounding in glee.
 
"Of old they were there!
Ever young, who are these
Whom Death cannot seize?
What Spirits of air?"
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Submitted on August 03, 2020

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John Campbell

John Campbell Shairp (30 July 1819 - 18 September 1885) was a Scottish poet, literary critic and academic. From his youth Shairp was a writer, but he did not publish early. In 1856 he issued a vigorous pamphlet on ‘The Wants of Scottish Universities and some of the Remedies.’ After settling at St. Andrews, he contributed frequently to periodicals. In 1864 he published Kilmahoe: A Highland pastoral, and other poems, in which he revealed his love of nature and of Scottish scenes and interests, and displayed a strong and original, if somewhat irregular, lyrical gift. Among the miscellaneous pieces in the volume, the tender and haunting "Bush aboon Traquair" easily won and retained popularity more…

All John Campbell poems | John Campbell Books

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    "Cree Fairies." Poetry.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2021. Web. 8 May 2021. <https://www.poetry.com/poem/55826/cree-fairies.>.

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