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A Song.

George Augustus Baker Jr 1849 ( New York City, New York) – 1906 ( New York City, New York)



I shouldn't like to say, I'm sure,
I shouldn't like to say,
Why I think of you more, and more, and more
As day flits after day.
Nor why I see in the Summer skies
Only the beauty of your sweet eyes,
The power by which you sway
A kingdom of hearts, that little you prize
I shouldn't like to say.
 
I shouldn't like to say, I'm sure,
I shouldn't like to say
Why I hear your voice, so fresh and pure,
In the dash of the laughing spray.
Nor why the wavelets that all the while,
In many a diamond-glittering file,
With truant sunbeams play,
Should make me remember your rippling smile
I shouldn't like to say.
 
I shouldn't like to say, I'm sure,
I shouldn't like to say,
Why all the birds should chirp of you,
Who live so far away.
Robin and oriole sing to me
From the leafy depths of our apple-tree,
With trunk so gnarled and gray
But why your name should their burden be
I shouldn't like to say.
 
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Submitted on August 03, 2020

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George Augustus Baker Jr

John F. Kensett, 1875 John F. Kensett, 1875 George Augustus Baker Jr (1821 – 1880) The son of a miniaturist, George Baker, Jr. grew up in New York City. Following his father’s example, he became a painter of miniatures on ivory, and becoming almost instantly successful, by the time he was sixteen, he had completed 150 miniatures and sold them for $5.00 a piece. For seven years, he supported himself this way while attending the National Academy of Design. From 1844-46, he studied in Europe and then established a portrait studio in New York. Women and children were his primary subjects. He also did portraits of painters John Frederick Kensett, a close friend, and Charles Loring Elliot, whom he greatly admired. He lived the last fourteen years of his life in Darien, Connecticut where he actively pursued his painting career but kept a studio in New York City. more…

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    "A Song." Poetry.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2021. Web. 23 Oct. 2021. <https://www.poetry.com/poem/55331/a-song.>.

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