New Prince New Pomp

Robert Southwell 1561 (Horsham St Faith) – 1595



Behold, a seely tender babe
   In freezing winter night
In homely manger trembling lies;
   Alas, a piteous sight!
The inns are full, no man will yield
   This little pilgrim bed,
But forced he is with seely beasts
   In crib to shroud his head.
Despise him not for lying there,
   First, what he is enquire,
An orient pearl is often found
   In depth of dirty mire.
Weigh not his crib, his wooden dish,
   Nor beasts that by him feed;
Weigh not his mother's poor attire
   Nor Joseph's simple weed.
This stable is a prince's court,
   This crib his chair of state,
The beasts are parcel of his pomp,
   The wooden dish his plate.
The persons in that poor attire
   His royal liveries wear;
The prince himself is come from heaven;
   This pomp is prized there.
With joy approach, O Christian right,
   Do homage to thy king;
And highly prize his humble pomp
   Which he from heaven doth bring.

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Submitted on May 13, 2011

Modified on March 05, 2023

48 sec read
96

Quick analysis:

Scheme ABCBDEFEGHIHJKHKLMNMHGOGBPNP
Closest metre Iambic tetrameter
Characters 896
Words 159
Stanzas 1
Stanza Lengths 28

Robert Southwell

Robert Southwell, also Saint Robert Southwell, was an English Roman Catholic priest of the Jesuit Order. He was also a poet and clandestine missionary in post-Reformation England. After being arrested and tortured by Sir Richard Topcliffe, Southwell was tried and convicted of high treason for his links to the Holy See. On 21 February 1595, Southwell was hanged, drawn and quartered at Tyburn. In 1970, he was canonised by Pope Paul VI as one of the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales. more…

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