Ode to a Taoist Wildflower



A Taoist Wildflower,
in a cultivated field,
standing bravely, ever firmly;
observing  nature’s offerings,
unsullied by pretenses of human imagery.

A Taoist Wildflower,
standing upright, towering beauty,
with barest essentials;
enough to satisfy basic needs;
not desiring of creature comforts.

A Taoist Wildflower,
adorned without frills;
not needing to be harnessed,
not ever needing to be reigned in;
simply observant of life’s cultivation.

A Taoist Wildflower,
by nature’s own clockwork,
ever blooming, ever blossoming;
a blooming, blossoming wildflower,
by nature’s own celestial design.

A Taoist Wildflower,
parsimoniously adorned;
the wind and rain companions,
the soil a plenitude of offerings;
wallowing in the glory of such wealth.

A Taoist Wildflower,
not falsified by artifacts;
by artifacts of competition,
just free to be one’s natural self;
free to sway and dance in synchrony.

A Taoist Wildflower,
unsullied by pretensions
of our human imagination;
bending, swaying with the wind,
in harmony and balance with all there is.

About this poem

Here am I in attendance at a conference in Long Island, New York, at the New York State Association for Bilingual Education (NYSABE), reminiscing on my life and experiences as a bilingual educator, and exchanging greetings with colleagues, past and present; giving me opportunity to also sit, relax, meditate, and write poetry. And so it is I’ve come to share with you this poem and the story behind it. While recently reading and reacting to online commentaries on poetry.com, I came across one such commentary by a young artist bearing the interesting sobriquet of “Wildflower 888. ” In my curiosity and response to that catching poetic name used by the online commentator that came to my attention on March 11, 2023, I wrote the following message: “I like your Wildflower moniker, imagery of life and nature in its original form — like the Tao — not restraining of others, letting all bloom to their full potential.” This seven-stanza Cinquain, “Ode to a Taoist Wildflower,” is an elaboration of those initial sentiments, suggestive of the therapeutic benefits of the ‘opposites’ in nature working harmoniously together, unhindered by rivalries. 

Font size:
Collection  PDF     
 

Written on March 18, 2023

Submitted by karlcfolkes on March 18, 2023

Modified by karlcfolkes on March 19, 2023

57 sec read
334

Quick analysis:

Scheme Axbcb Abxxx Axxde Axxax Axfcx Axexd Afexx
Closest metre Iambic tetrameter
Characters 1,054
Words 193
Stanzas 7
Stanza Lengths 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5

Karl Constantine FOLKES

Retired educator of Jamaican ancestry with a lifelong interest in composing poetry dealing particularly with the metaphysics of self-reflection; completed a dissertation in Children’s Literature in 1991 at New York University entitled: An Analysis of Wilhelm Grimm’s ‘Liebe Mili’ (translated into English as “Dear Mili”), Employing Von Franzian Methodological Processes of Analytical Psychology. The subject of the dissertation concerned the process of Individuation. more…

All Karl Constantine FOLKES poems | Karl Constantine FOLKES Books

71 fans

Discuss the poem Ode to a Taoist Wildflower with the community...

2 Comments
  • Teril
    How sweet to aspire to the ways of a Taoist Wildflower.
    LikeReply1 year ago
  • karlcfolkes
    Soulofdivya,
    I reached deep down into the bottomless pit of a Dantesque world and found you lingering there in the company of wayfarers, as an emissary, a resident of poetic messages composed to lift lost souls up to loftier heights. Your poetry speaks soulful volumes. 
    LikeReply1 year ago

Translation

Find a translation for this poem in other languages:

Select another language:

  • - Select -
  • 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified)
  • 繁體中文 (Chinese - Traditional)
  • Español (Spanish)
  • Esperanto (Esperanto)
  • 日本語 (Japanese)
  • Português (Portuguese)
  • Deutsch (German)
  • العربية (Arabic)
  • Français (French)
  • Русский (Russian)
  • ಕನ್ನಡ (Kannada)
  • 한국어 (Korean)
  • עברית (Hebrew)
  • Gaeilge (Irish)
  • Українська (Ukrainian)
  • اردو (Urdu)
  • Magyar (Hungarian)
  • मानक हिन्दी (Hindi)
  • Indonesia (Indonesian)
  • Italiano (Italian)
  • தமிழ் (Tamil)
  • Türkçe (Turkish)
  • తెలుగు (Telugu)
  • ภาษาไทย (Thai)
  • Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese)
  • Čeština (Czech)
  • Polski (Polish)
  • Bahasa Indonesia (Indonesian)
  • Românește (Romanian)
  • Nederlands (Dutch)
  • Ελληνικά (Greek)
  • Latinum (Latin)
  • Svenska (Swedish)
  • Dansk (Danish)
  • Suomi (Finnish)
  • فارسی (Persian)
  • ייִדיש (Yiddish)
  • հայերեն (Armenian)
  • Norsk (Norwegian)
  • English (English)

Citation

Use the citation below to add this poem to your bibliography:

Style:MLAChicagoAPA

"Ode to a Taoist Wildflower" Poetry.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 22 Jul 2024. <https://www.poetry.com/poem/154339/ode-to-a-taoist-wildflower>.

Become a member!

Join our community of poets and poetry lovers to share your work and offer feedback and encouragement to writers all over the world!

July 2024

Poetry Contest

Join our monthly contest for an opportunity to win cash prizes and attain global acclaim for your talent.
9
days
9
hours
58
minutes

Special Program

Earn Rewards!

Unlock exciting rewards such as a free mug and free contest pass by commenting on fellow members' poems today!

Browse Poetry.com

Quiz

Are you a poetry master?

»
Roald Dahl wrote: "The animal I really dig, above all others is the..."
A dog
B cat
C horse
D pig