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Dithyramb

Friedrich Schiller 1759 (Marbach am Neckar) – 1805 (Weimar)

Believe me, together
  The bright gods come ever,
  Still as of old;
  Scarce see I Bacchus, the giver of joy,
  Than comes up fair Eros, the laugh-loving boy,
  And Phoebus, the stately, behold!

  They come near and nearer,
  The heavenly ones all--
  The gods with their presence
  Fill earth as their hall!

  Say, how shall I welcome,
  Human and earthborn,
  Sons of the sky?
  Pour out to me--pour the full life that ye live!
  What to ye, O ye gods! can the mortal one give?

  The joys can dwell only
  In Jupiter's palace--
  Brimmed bright with your nectar,
  Oh, reach me the chalice!

  "Hebe, the chalice
  Fill full to the brim!
  Steep his eyes--steep his eyes in the bath of the dew,
  Let him dream, while the Styx is concealed from his view,
  That the life of the gods is for him!"

  It murmurs, it sparkles,
  The fount of delight;
  The bosom grows tranquil--
  The eye becomes bright.

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Submitted on May 13, 2011

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Friedrich Schiller

Johann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller was a German poet philosopher historian and playwright During the last seventeen years of his life Schiller struck up a productive if complicated friendship with already famous and influential Johann Wolfgang Goethe with whom he frequently discussed issues concerning aesthetics and encouraged Goethe to finish works he left merely as sketches this relationship and these discussions led to a period now referred to as Weimar Classicism They also worked together on Die Xenien The Xenies a collection of short but harshly satirical poems in which both Schiller and Goethe verbally attacked those persons they perceived to be enemies of their aesthetic agenda. more…

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