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Tired

Ada Cambridge 1844 (St Germans, Norfolk) – 1926 (Melbourne)



O For wings! that I might soar
A little way above the floor,
A little way beyond the roar—

A little nearer to the sky!
To the blue hills, lifted high
Out of all our misery.

Where alone is heard the lark,
Warbling in the infinite arc
From the dawning to the dark;

Where the callow eaglets wink
On the bare and breezy brink,
And slow pinions rise and sink.

Where the dim white breakers beat
Under cloud-drifts at our feet,
Singing, singing, low and sweet;

Where we see the glimmering bay
Greyly melting far away,
On the confines of the day;

Where the green larch-fringes sweep
Rocky defiles, still and steep;
Where the tender lichens creep;

Where the gentian-blossoms blow,
Set in crystal stars of snow;
Where the downward torrents flow

To the plains and yellow leas,
Glancing, twinkling through the trees—
Pure, as from celestial seas.

Where the face of heaven has smiled
Aye on freedom, sweet and wild,
Aye on beauty undefiled.

Where no sound of human speech,
And no human passions, reach;
Where the angels sit and teach.

Where no troublous foot has trod;
Where is impressed on the sod
Only hand and heart of God!

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Submitted on May 13, 2011

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Ada Cambridge

Ada Cambridge, later known as Ada Cross, was an English-born Australian writer. She wrote more than 25 works of fiction, three volumes of poetry and two autobiographical works. Many of her novels were serialised in Australian newspapers but never published in book form. While she was known to friends and family by her married name, Ada Cross, her newspaper readers knew her as A. C.. She later reverted to her maiden name, Ada Cambridge, and that is how she is known today.  more…

All Ada Cambridge poems | Ada Cambridge Books

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    "Tired" Poetry.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2021. Web. 27 Nov. 2021. <https://www.poetry.com/poem/126/tired>.

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