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My Dear Fellow Earthlings

Karl Constantine FOLKES 1935 (Portland)



My Dear Fellow Earthlings
of all races and all creeds.
I bid you greetings;
And my blessings
I extend to you all.

Heartfelt blessings with much joy,
I lay upon you, all my brethren;
with my gracious love and bounty,
I’ve been reaching out to you;
e’er since the dawn of time.

O’er seeing everything you do.
Gracing the precious planet
that you call Earth.
There was a time that I recall
when all of you were close to me.

You spoke with me melodiously.
in utterances without blemish;
in utterances that I could cherish;
with diction all could understand.
Faith, Hope and love was still the brand.

But now the oceans of your land
have sadly separated you —
The one from the other.
You speak in tongues unknown to some.
Your customs seem so strange to many.

You govern with such differences.
Your laws are many, yet not steady.
Your customs conjure up behaviors,
that satisfy you, but not to me;
Your sermons and your ministries.

Your habits, your philosophies,
though full of wisdom, separate
bar each other, one from another:
like a mother hen pecking some,
nourishing only those she cherishes.

With sweet compassionate desire.
I plead with you, my clan, for unity.
It is a conscript that I seek.
From dawn of time I’ve made my writ;
as covenant with ethics fit.

Maintain your planet harmonized.
brothers and sisters all together;
It is a family that I need.
All my peoples unified — as one.
Though war and pestilence may prevail.

Though poverties invade some spaces,
the wealth bequeathed you as my deed,
is sufficient to meet all your needs.
Equitably imparted, it leaves none wanting.
Equitable distribution, without offenses.

Let justice, fair and square, be dispensed.
Thus one command now I give;
given before, and now repeated.
It is a teaching sealed with love,
that loving kindness be your motto.

For every fellowman that you meet,
It really, really does not ever matter,
the form they take that you call race.
You look upon the outer image.
I see the soul from deep within.

For you are made of sterner stuff,
divinely breathed eternally,
with my design and my creation;
to bring you back to what you once were.
Out of many, yet always as one.

Just as the father honoring the son,
so honor I as kindred folk;
all my peoples — with no exceptions.
Dear Fellow Earthlings, heed my call.
This is a message for all nations.

That you come together as one family.
You’re all my children — I have many.
I look upon you and I wonder;
whether you can e’er remember,
when you as children played together,

Tumbling here and tumbling there,
your nicks and scratches not a bother.
Now with time passed throughout the ages,
sophistication engenders rages;
civilizations in all their scattered stages.

Removed from garnering heavenly wages.
My petition thus has many phases.
To wit, to match the various ages,
that you as humans sometimes fear;
and the sufferings that some must bear.

That all humans you endear,
whether they be far or they be near;
with greetings that you all renew,
the trust and faith I have in you.
And with this writ I bid adieu.

About this poem

This poem was written from the perspective of a divine parent of Planet Earth overseeing his creation with compassionate, tender loving kindness.

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Written on October 02, 2021

Submitted by karlcfolkes on October 02, 2021

Modified by karlcfolkes

3:12 min read
177 Views

Karl Constantine FOLKES

Retired educator of Jamaican ancestry with a lifelong interest in composing poetry dealing particularly with the metaphysics of self-reflection; completed a dissertation in Children’s Literature in 1995 at New York University entitled: An Analysis of Wilhelm Grimm’s “Dear Mili” Employing Von Franzian Methodological Processes. The subject of the dissertation concerned the process of Individuation. more…

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    "My Dear Fellow Earthlings" Poetry.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2022. Web. 28 Nov. 2022. <https://www.poetry.com/poem/111122/my-dear-fellow--earthlings>.

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