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The Gill-netter

Emera 1946 (Wa)

Ode


As the old Troller heads back into harbor its barnacled hull cuts through the rippling waves, steady as she goes, casting shadows deep into the water from her starboard bow. The slow rhythmic chug of her engine shouts out across the sea, her mighty song reminds her crew she is still sea worthy as any ship ought be.

Many a storm she has weathered and many a fine catch she has carried, thousands of miles of coastline she has paralleled even conquered many more miles of sea and ocean. She speaks of strength in her mighty song always keeping true on her compass course with slender motion.

With her gill nets hanging high to dry and the hull running deep, she boasts of the fine catch at sea and stories be told. Slowly she glides into port to unload the prized cargo of fish, and last a serious wash to remove the salt that clings to the walls of the hold.

Her weathered hull is dotted with shells and clinging seaweed and reveals many lines of sea rings. Significant of days when the hold was full or sometimes not so laden. The higher marks boast of a good catch that day when the sea was giving and kind to this seaworthy maiden. If the lines could tell tales they would describe the heroism of her crews and their trust in her, through 20 foot waves and hurricane weather, not a ship her size could have done better.

A working ship unassuming in style yet bold in spirit, she courageously sets sail again to be free to glide under the stars and greet new sunrises and sing her love song to the sea.

About this poem

I wrote this while fishing and watching the old Trollers/Gill-netters come in and go out in the Sound in the Pacific Northwest. The sound of the Gill-netter/Troller was deeply rhythmic.

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Written on June 18, 1989

Submitted by emera on September 01, 2021

1:24 min read
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Emera

I have been writing poems and stories for years under "emera" and mainly write about family, romance, fiction, fly-fishing and issues I contemplate about. more…

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    "The Gill-netter" Poetry.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2022. Web. 26 Jan. 2022. <https://www.poetry.com/poem/108313/the-gill-netter>.

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