Welcome to Poetry.com

Poetry.com is a huge collection of poems from famous and amateur poets from around the world — collaboratively published by a community of authors and contributing editors.

Navigate through our poetry database by subjects, alphabetically or simply search by keywords. You can submit a new poem, discuss and rate existing work, listen to poems using voice pronunciation and even translate pieces to many common and not-so-common languages.

Rate this poem:(0.00 / 0 votes)

The Red Eyed Stranger

At the end they declared " a temporary separation of interest" which named "The Red Eyed Stranger" the new World's heavyweight champion; this puts in dispute the totalist and Trophy,; by Allowing the disputed companies to claim the Title in dispute. The three companies of the now slot alliance recognizes the former. Champion as current titlist. A clause in the Red Eyed Strangers contract, gives him choose, due to what was his position, in both pro and company rankings.

If you didn't know, The Red Eyed Stranger" had been suspended in another company. He ranked 12 the in the official rankings. The match was signed as a warmup for the champ. He was ranked 32 behind one of the worst wrestlers in the industry, two days ago in another company, now he's rank number one over all! Days later after
The official annoucment, Shadow Cobblestone, a promoter in the disputed company, fired the sound man for fine tuning The Red Eyed Strangers' theme song. They looked at films of him losing and made a video, it went to television, on a live broadcast, and durning the presentation, out came the Red Eyed Stranger, brawling his way to ringside. They suspended him, from the ringside area, he could only take center ring via a dolly and sercurty. His theme song was banned.
And the guy he cleanly defeated, was named world champion in dispute, and he was to be recognized only as the contention titlist!

About this poem

The western sound with a bullwhip and wagon wheels rattling, with a whiney singer cantering over a basset, phunky western ballad, it made promoter dislike him.

Font size:
 

Submitted by allanterry542curtis_2 on July 08, 2021

1:14 min read
1 View

2B phamous

He's gotta do it! He just gotta! more…

All 2B phamous poems | 2B phamous Books

FAVORITE (1 fan)

Discuss this 2B phamous poem with the community:

0 Comments

    Translation

    Find a translation for this poem in other languages:

    Select another language:

    • - Select -
    • 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified)
    • 繁體中文 (Chinese - Traditional)
    • Español (Spanish)
    • Esperanto (Esperanto)
    • 日本語 (Japanese)
    • Português (Portuguese)
    • Deutsch (German)
    • العربية (Arabic)
    • Français (French)
    • Русский (Russian)
    • ಕನ್ನಡ (Kannada)
    • 한국어 (Korean)
    • עברית (Hebrew)
    • Gaeilge (Irish)
    • Українська (Ukrainian)
    • اردو (Urdu)
    • Magyar (Hungarian)
    • मानक हिन्दी (Hindi)
    • Indonesia (Indonesian)
    • Italiano (Italian)
    • தமிழ் (Tamil)
    • Türkçe (Turkish)
    • తెలుగు (Telugu)
    • ภาษาไทย (Thai)
    • Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese)
    • Čeština (Czech)
    • Polski (Polish)
    • Bahasa Indonesia (Indonesian)
    • Românește (Romanian)
    • Nederlands (Dutch)
    • Ελληνικά (Greek)
    • Latinum (Latin)
    • Svenska (Swedish)
    • Dansk (Danish)
    • Suomi (Finnish)
    • فارسی (Persian)
    • ייִדיש (Yiddish)
    • հայերեն (Armenian)
    • Norsk (Norwegian)
    • English (English)

    Citation

    Use the citation below to add this poem to your bibliography:

    Style:MLAChicagoAPA

    "The Red Eyed Stranger" Poetry.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2021. Web. 20 Sep. 2021. <https://www.poetry.com/poem/104542/the-red-eyed-stranger>.

    Become a member!

    Join our community of poets and poetry lovers to share your work and offer feedback and encouragement to writers all over the world!

    Browse Poetry.com

    Quiz

    Are you a poetry master?

    »
    "I walk down the garden paths, and all the daffodils are blowing"
    • A. Gwendolyn Brooks
    • B. Amy Lowell
    • C. Elizabeth Barrett Browning
    • D. Emily Dickinson

    Our favorite collection of

    Famous Poets

    »