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The battle of Reading Rock - Part 03

Royston 1946 (Reading)

Another flag flew high, over the blue sky,
where the Japanese fortress lay
As they drove their tank, through each festival rank,
the fans scattered and ran away.
Imparting fear, to all those near,
folk panicked as they fled
No one would dare, stand up to them there;
they could only look on in dread.

So with great care, after much prayer,
asking God for His protection
we left our tent, and off we went,
heading in the forts direction.
As we entered their fort, it made them distraught,
and to their great surprise.
Approaching them, we caused mayhem,
for we'd come in the name of Christ

Making a fuss, they challenged us,
so we said that we had been sent
By the living Word, of Christ the Lord,
Who commanded them all to repent.
“You're mad,” said they, turning us away,
“What are you both on about?”
They were so rough, and acted tough;
grabbing us and throwing us out.

Narrative
Some fans dressed up in Japanese war gear drove around in old battered car converted into a tank using a telegraph pole. Their campsite, displayed a Japanese flag and was known as the Japanese fortress. We spent some time in prayer and left the sanctity of the Jesus tent and went to pay them a visit and said that we were from the Jesus tent pointing to the banner across the field and had come to talk to them about Jesus. To share His gospel of salvation. That He was King of kings and Lord of lords and commands them to repent and turn to Him for forgiveness. That was the last straw—they did not like what we had said and threw us out
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Submitted by royston on May 29, 2021

1:27 min read
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Royston

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